Sunday, February 18, 2007

Achillea

Achillea YarrowAchillea (Yarrow)

Origins
Achillea, commonly known as yarrow, is named for the mythological Greek god Achilles, who is said to have used some of this plant's more than 100 species for medicinal purposes. Today, yarrow's blooms populate garden walks and floral designs alike, while herbalists continue to use the plant for its fever-reducing, skin-cleansing and wound-healing properties.

Availability and Vase Life
February through September.
4-7 days.

Design Uses
An interesting addition to mixed summer arrangements. Yarrow dries easily and is long lasting for use in dried designs.


Colors: Yellow, white, pink, red.


Grasshopper on an Yarrow
Achillea is a genus of about 85 flowering plants, in the family Asteraceae, commonly referred to as yarrow. They occur in Europe and temperate areas of Asia. A few grow in North America. These plants typically have frilly, hairy, aromatic leaves.

These plants show large, flat clusters of small flowers at the top of the stem. These flowers can be white, yellow, orange, pink or red. A number of species are popular garden plants.

The genus was named for the Greek mythological character Achilles. According to the Iliad, Achilles' soldiers used yarrow to treat wounds, hence some of its common names such as allheal and bloodwort.

Achillea species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species - see list of Lepidoptera which feed on Achillea.

1 comment:

travelpeople said...

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